New composting toilet at a Langwith farm will save 86,000 litres of water a year

Braving the rain to cut the ribbon are Coun John Handley, Eddie Peat, of Four Winds Energy Co-operative and Coun Kevin Greaves watched by managing director Jennie Street and Board Director Kath Sharpe
Braving the rain to cut the ribbon are Coun John Handley, Eddie Peat, of Four Winds Energy Co-operative and Coun Kevin Greaves watched by managing director Jennie Street and Board Director Kath Sharpe

A new composting toilet has been unveiled at a Langwith farm which aims to annually save thousands of pounds in water and energy bills

The new toilet at Rhubarb Farm was installed thanks to Nottinghamshire County Council’s Local Improvement Scheme ( LIS) as well as funding from Four Winds Energy Co-operative, a community-based on-shore wind turbine cooperative.


Rhubarb Farm offers a range of work placements, training and volunteering opportunities to people with long-term issues, change their lives for the better.


The Local Improvement Scheme Capital funding worth £16,410 was awarded to the farm towards the new composting toilet as well as range of improvements including creating new pathways to help make access easier for volunteers and visitors, particularly wheel-chair users. This work is due to finish by December this year.


The funding has also gone towards a new portable building and helping equip it as a charity shop to help the farm diversify its income streams and improve sustainability.


Coun John Handley, vice-chairman of the Communities and Place Committee, at Nottinghamshire County Council, said: “Rhubarb Farm does so much great work encouraging more people to grow their own fruit and veg, so this fits very well with this organisation’s ethos to find more ways to reduce our carbon footprint.


 “It certainly demonstrates the many different ways the Local Improvement Scheme is helping our communities.


 And with National Recycling Week in full swing this week this is a fantastic example of how this type of investment can bring long-term environmental benefits.”


 Coun Kevin Greaves, councillor for Worksop South, backed Rhubarb Farm’s bid for LIS funding.


He said: “This organisation does so much impressive work, I’m delighted the new facilities will save money in the long term, which can be invested back into this successful social enterprise which helps so many people, whatever their support needs, background and abilities.”


 Eddie Peat, of Four Winds Energy Co-operative, who co-funded this part of the project, said: “We are very pleased to be able to assist in the funding of the second composting toilet at Rhubarb Farm.”


 Jennie Street, managing director of Rhubarb Farm, said: "The benefit to Rhubarb Farm of this funding has been fantastic. We have been able to build a second composting toilet resulting in a potential further saving of about 86,000 litres of water a year.


 “Everyone who comes to Rhubarb Farm is a volunteer, no matter what their needs or abilities and volunteers were involved in the design and build of the toilet, which has given them a sense of achievement.


"It even has a green roof to attract bees and we can use the good friable compost around our fruit trees.”


Composting toilets, which turn waste into compost, are proved to be one most environmentally friendly toilet systems, not only saving on water and power bills but reducing the need for potentially harmful chemicals.