Learn the fascinating story of the Battle of Gainsborough in new exhibition

Gainsborough Heritage Society chairman Andrew Birkitt receiving a bouquet of flowers donated by Fabulous Flowers (on behalf of Gainsborough Life)
Gainsborough Heritage Society chairman Andrew Birkitt receiving a bouquet of flowers donated by Fabulous Flowers (on behalf of Gainsborough Life)

Gainsborough Heritage Centre opened a new exhibition on July 28 to commemorate the 375th anniversary of the Battle of Gainsborough, writes Gemma Clarke.

The exhibition explores the stories of the battle with memorabilia, costumes, battle armour and much more with items loaned from the English Civil War Society.

This year, the centre is involved with Heritage Lincolnshire open days and staff are excited to announce that free access to the centre is available over the weekends of September 8 and 9 and September 15 and 16 .

Pop the dates in your diary and find out more about Gainsborough’s past.

Gainsborough-born author Margaret Dickinson is sharing her knowledge, research and ideas in a fantastic talk in the town this month.

Don’t miss out as Margaret will be talking at the Weston Rooms on Saturday, August 18 from 7pm.

She will discuss the inspirations behind the writing of her famous books that include Plough the Furrow, Sow the Seas and Reap the Harvest and more recently, Daughters of Courage, The Buffer Girls, Red Sky in the Morning, Suffragette Girl and The Poppy Girls.

If you enjoy reading Margaret’s work and would like to find out more then come along and join her for a lovely evening that will include refreshments.

Massive congratulations to Gainsborough Heritage Society chairman Andrew Birkitt on being chosen as Gainsborough’s favourite volunteer with the Gainsborough Life Magazine.

As far back as 1993, Andrew teamed up with another local history enthusiast called Paul Kemp and formed the society.

They were approached by the Gainsborough Museums Forum to hold an exhibition in order to gain public support for the beginnings of a museum within the town.

Their exhibition held at Richmond House featured photographs and memorabilia that told the story of the town and visits from local school groups highlighted the need for a museum in the town.

Almost 1,000 people visited over the first days that this exhibition was open to the public.

The Gainsborough Heritage Centre, now based at the Old Post Office building on the corner of Spital Terrace and North Street, is the lasting legacy from the beginnings of the two young men who launched their exhibition in 1993.

Next year, the association celebrates its 25th birthday and the team will mark the anniversary with a series of special events.