Brilliant, funny and well-acted

Dress rehearsal for the Lindrick Players lastest production "We Found Love and an Exquisite Set of Porcelain Figures Aboard the SS Farndale", pictured are Helen Stephenson, Sharon Greyling, Helene Sprowell, Brady Mould and Pat Shepherd (w120423-12)

Dress rehearsal for the Lindrick Players lastest production "We Found Love and an Exquisite Set of Porcelain Figures Aboard the SS Farndale", pictured are Helen Stephenson, Sharon Greyling, Helene Sprowell, Brady Mould and Pat Shepherd (w120423-12)

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In Lindrick Players’ latest production the ladies of Farndale Avenue Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society took over the stage at Carlton-in-Lindrick Village Hall.

We have seen this group hopelessly overacting and bumbling around the stage on a few occasions and it can be said that they’re a pretty hopeless bunch.

No I don’t mean Lindrick Players of course - but the group they play.

Under the direction of Pat Thomas, the cast of six (who are an experienced team) had to be brave enough to appear totally incompetent, something very difficult to do well.

In this play (wait for it) We Found Love and an Exquisite Set of Porcelain Figurines Aboard the SS Farndale, we saw members of the fictitious dramatic society playing numerous roles.

In fact Helen Stephenson managed to play five roles and with little time for costume changes, sometimes wearing all the clothes at once.

Pat Shepherd flounced around the stage (not for the first time) as Thelma Greenwood – a bit of a diva.

Helene Sprowell played Felicity, a much put-upon member of the society who, after experiencing a vicious stab with a fork from a petulant Thelma, appeared to bleed copiously until (after a few other mishaps) she approached collapse.

Sharon Greyling played Fiona, the quiet one and Jennifer Stephenson, the disc-jockey who should really have had the stage in the first place.

Brady Mould was Gordon, quite obviously not a member of the Townswomen’s Guild, but somehow dragged in to cover for an absentee.

As the reluctant Gordon moped about the stage, drank very dubious stage cocktails and the odd stale doughnut, exiting frequently to be, shall we say, unwell, we all howled with laughter.

This was a funny play, well executed and a good evening’s entertainment.

As for Adrian, the sound and lighting engineer for the society? His real name shall remain a mystery.

As usual I am left with some burning questions. Why do we see Helen Stephenson glued to clipboards and vicious-looking handbags?

Is Sharon really that quiet? Will Helene Sprowell recover from her ordeal?

Is Pat Shepherd being typecast and what will Brady Mould do next?

To find out we will just have to wait for Lindrick Players next production.

By Wendy Fidoe