Rotherham: Seven people given fines for dropping cigarette ends

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Smokers who drop their cigarette ends in Rotherham are being warned they face substantial fines.

Rotherham Council’s zero tolertance approach continued at the town’s magistrates’ court on 25th September, when seven people were convicted of littering cigarette ends.

Stuart Ward and Candice Smith, were both fined and ordered to pay costs for each dropping a cigarette end at the Dinnington Interchange.

Ward, of Shaldon Grove, Aston, pleaded guilty via post and was fined £275, with £180.74 costs and a victim surcharge of £27.50.

Smith of Osbert Drive, Thurcroft, was convicted in her absence. She was fined £400, with £180.74 costs and a victim surcharge of £40.

Two other people, Kristie Lawton of St Leger Close, Laughton Common, and Carly Holland of Hartington Road, Holmes, were both convicted in their absence for dropping cigarette ends in Frederick Street in Rotherham Town Centre.

Lawton was fined £400, ordered to pay costs of £180.74 and a victim surcharge of £40 while Holland was fined £400, costs of £180.74 and a victim surcharge of £40.

Two other people were also fined for dropping cigarette ends in Rotherham Town Centre. Joshua Hall of Kilnhurst Road, Rawmarsh, was convicted in his absence of littering in College Street. He was fined £400, ordered to pay costs £180.74 and a victim surcharge of £40.

Stephen Wright of Wesley Avenue, Aston, was also convicted in his absence for littering in All Saints Square. He was fined £400, with £180.74 costs and a victim surcharge of £40.

Megan Firth of Quarry Bank, Huddersfield Road, Barnsley, did not attend court either but was convicted in her absence of dropping a cigarette end in Golden Smithies Lane at Manvers. She was fined £400, ordered to pay costs of £180 and a £40 victim surcharge.

Coun Richard Russell, Rotherham Council’s cabinet member for waste, said the authority wants to hold people accountable for their actions that impact on the local environment.

“Improving quality of life and dealing with anti-social behaviour are priorities for the council,” he added.

“Taking pride in our neighbourhoods and keeping them free from litter, dog fouling, graffiti and fly-tipping are particular issues that are raised regularly by local people.”