Outwood Academy Valley pupils learn about risks of cyber crime in e-safety scheme

Police and crime comissioner for Nottinghamshire Paddy Tipping meets Outwood Academy Valley pupils.
Police and crime comissioner for Nottinghamshire Paddy Tipping meets Outwood Academy Valley pupils.

Pupils from Outwood Academy Valley learned about the risks and consequences of cyber-crime when they took part in an e-safety project at the Galleries of Justice Museum.

The scheme, named “Virtual Justice”, has been funded by police and crime comissioner Paddy Tipping’s Community Safety Fund- and aims to safeguard and prevent young peoplefrom becoming involved in cyber-crime and other cyber related issues.

Pupils got the chance to meet Mr Tipping and participated in a a full day of activities at the museum, including a courtroom workshop focusing on cyberbullying in the Youth Court on site.

Tim Desmond, CEO of the Galleries of Justice Museum, said: “We were delighted to welcome Paddy Tipping to the Galleries of Justice Museum so he could see first-hand the project that has been supported by the Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner’s Community Safety Fund.

“The Virtual Justice project is essential to reduce cyber bullying.

“It also helps young people understand the consequences of cybercrimes from the perpetrator and victim’s point of view, so there is less risk of them becoming a perpetrator or victim.”

So far, over 900 young people across Nottinghamshire have taken part in Virtual Justice.

The Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner’s Community Safety Fund provided over £4,900 to enable 280 Year 8 pupils to participate in the project.

The 2015 Nottinghamshire Cyber Survey shows that children aged 12-13 are the most vulnerable to cyber crime and need targeted support.