Maltby: Volunteers dig deep in day centre garden

Willmott Dixon volunteers roll up their sleeves to help create a new garden at the Addison Centre in Maltby
Willmott Dixon volunteers roll up their sleeves to help create a new garden at the Addison Centre in Maltby
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Volunteers and generous donations have come forward after the Guardian appealed for help on behalf of the Addison Day Centre in Maltby.

The centre, which provides care and activities for people with complex disabilities, is in desperate need of help to finish its garden project.

Service users at Rotherham Council's Addison Centre were delighted by a visit from construction firm Willmott Dixon who volunteered to help build a new path

Service users at Rotherham Council's Addison Centre were delighted by a visit from construction firm Willmott Dixon who volunteered to help build a new path

An educational log cabin has already been built in the grounds.

The initial foundations were dug by volunteers from Rotherham’s Willmott Dixon branch.

Streetpride came along with a digger to finish the foundations and various other donations of funding, resources and manpower have helped build the cabin from the ground.

Marshall Quarries, Freedom Group, Food Aware, Hyperlocal Food, Rotherham Hydroponics, The Prince’s Trust, and Direct Line and North Anston Landscaping and Aggregate Supplies and Kiveton Buffs are organisations who have got stuck in so far.

But more assistance is needed to get the garden project fionished before summer is over.

A flagstone path is half complete. It will eventually allow wheelchair users to access the activity field.

Raised vegetable beds and polytunnels will also be used by service users to grow their own produce to sell. Michael Pearson, Willmott Dixon’s local customer and community officer, said, “Our apprentices have previously visited the day centre to make a start on the memorial garden by planting daffodil bulbs, and they were keen to return and make the most of their skills to improve the experience for all users of the centre.”

Dianne Harper, project manager at the Addison Centre, said the partnership with Willmott Dixon and other organisations had been a positive experience for the centre’s trainees.

“They have worked alongside the apprentices, learning new skills, and gained confidence and self esteem,” she said.

“The apprentices have also helped the trainees understand the aspects of skills required to work within a horticulture environment.”

To lend a hand or donate money or materials call Addison Centre on 01709 812358.