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Inquest into Scotter baby’s tragic cot death

COURT: Court Case

COURT: Court Case

A BABY from Scotter died of cot death aged just 10-weeks-old, an inquest heard.

James Edward Allison was described as a ‘happy, healthy, well-grown and well-cared for’ baby during an inquest at Grantham Magistrates’ Court on Thursday 10th January.

The infant was found unresponsive in his cot by his mother Melissa on 8th August 2012 before his death was confirmed at Scunthorpe General Hospital.

His death remained unexplained after a review of his clinical history and James had visited a GP the day before his death for innoculations and a full physical examination.

The baby’s GP Dr David Allan Jolly described him as ‘a happy, smiling and thriving baby boy’.

The inquest heard that at around 3.30am on on 8th August, James’ mother awoke suddenly to realise that James hadn’t woken up for a feed.

James’ father then attempted CPR while his mother called for an ambulance. Paramedics then took him to Scunthorpe Hospital where his death was confirmed.

Paramedics reported that ‘there were no signs of trauma or injury’.

Concluding the inquest, Lincolnshire coroner Stuart Fisher said that it was a blameless and tragic death.

He recorded a verdict that James died of natural causes from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) - or cot death.

“It is of particular importance that James was described as happy, healthy and well-cared for,” said Mr Fisher.

“I would like to offer my thoughts and deepest sympathies to the family.”

A spokesman from NHS Choices said: “In the UK, at least 300 babies die suddenly and unexpectedly every year.”

“Despite these deaths, SIDS is rare and the risk of your baby dying from it is low.”

The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths is the UK’s leading baby charity aiming to prevent unexpected deaths in infancy and promote infant health.

For information, advice and support you can call the FSID Freephone Helpline on 0808 802 6868, email helpline@fsid.org.uk or visit www. fsid.org.uk

 

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