DCSIMG

Gainsborough: Residents have been given a tour around sewage treatment works

editorial image

editorial image

Gainsborough residents were so intrigued to know what happens when they flush their loo, they went on a trip around the local sewage treatment works to find out.

Severn Trent Water opened the doors to the works because its £2m makeover to improve sewage treatment for the town had recently been completed so it was a perfect opportunity to let locals find out about the improvements and discover what happens after they’ve flushed.

Severn Trent Water’s area manager, Dale Collison, said: “Every day we flush our loos and empty our sinks, but few people know what happens to the water after it leaves our homes.”

“We don’t just send it straight out into the rivers, it’s treated very thoroughly and for those who were interested, we were keen to show locals how we treat their waste water, safely.

“We’ve recently made £2m worth of improvements at Gainsborough sewage treatment works to help reduce smells and protect the local waterways.”

“We’ve also installed new equipment to help filter waste water and remove more chemicals, which will better protect the local environment and improve the service we give our customers.”

“So we were keen to show the local community how our work is making a difference.”

“We had a good time and we were pleased with the turn out on the day.”

Gainsborough sewage treatment works serves more than 9,000 homes and businesses in the area.

The £2m improvements, which were carried out from October 2013 to July 2014, are now complete.

Dale added: “Now we’ve made the improvements to the sewage treatment works, we’d encourage local people to think before they flush.”

“When people flush or wash away the wrong items, it clogs up the sewer system, causing blockages and sewer flooding. Then it all ends up at our sewage treatment works.”

“By simply bagging and binning items like nappies, wipes, sanitary products and cooking fat, you help to prevent nasty blocked sewers.”

“Let’s work together, to keep the sewers clear.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page