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Gainsborough: More fracking sites possible

Prime Minister David Cameron looks on during a guided tour of the IGas shale drilling plant oil depot near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday January 13, 2014. French oil giant Total announced that it will become the first major oil company to explore for shale gas in Britain, confirming a report in The Financial Times. The Financial Times had reported that Total would announce the deal in which Singapore-based Dart Energy and UK-listed Igas and Edgdon resources are also partners in the project. See PA story POLITICS Fracking. Photo credit should read: Lindsey Parnaby/PA Wire

Prime Minister David Cameron looks on during a guided tour of the IGas shale drilling plant oil depot near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday January 13, 2014. French oil giant Total announced that it will become the first major oil company to explore for shale gas in Britain, confirming a report in The Financial Times. The Financial Times had reported that Total would announce the deal in which Singapore-based Dart Energy and UK-listed Igas and Edgdon resources are also partners in the project. See PA story POLITICS Fracking. Photo credit should read: Lindsey Parnaby/PA Wire

IGas Energy Plc, the UK’s leading onshore oil and gas exploration, are looking for more areas in and around Gainsborough for fracking.

IGas has taken initial steps to find out if it is worth applying for permission to undertake test drilling in the area.

The drilling would be to take rock samples to find out more about the amount of gas which might be underground.

IGas have been drilling for gas and oil in Gainsborough and Beckingham for more than 30 years and already have more than 40 operational wells.

IGas are holding a public consultation tomorrow (Wednesday 16th July) at The Mayflower Bar and Eatery in High Street, Austerfield, Doncaster between 3pm and 8pm to allow residents to learn more about how onshore drilling works.

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, involves drilling deep underground and releasing a high-pressure mix of water, sand and chemicals to crack rocks and release gas stored inside.

It is estimated that nationally shale development could be the key to creating 64,500 jobs and £33bn worth of investment in the next 18 years.

Bassetlaw MP John Mann has welcomed the creation of jobs and investment in the area and is encouraging local that local people have their say on any plans to extract gas.

However people are opposed to fracking in this area.

Leon Duveen, who is opposed to fracking, said: “My feeling is fracking is an untried and untested way of working.”

“Even if they go along this route there is no guarantee the amount of gas they extract will be meaningful.”

“It will put maintaining a sustainable energy source back many years.”

Chairman of Bassetlaw Against Fracking, David Larder, said: “It is likely to cause more risk of climate change because of the carbon emissions.”

“What we should be doing is putting money into sustainable energy.”

“Nobody has said what is going to happen to the sites in 50 years as they will be drilling down through the aqua fires where we get our drinking water.”

“If there any gaps in the well casing it could cause serious damage to the health of the public in the near vicinity.”

IGas are committed to consulting with the public through every stage of the process to secure permission to test, explore and extract any kind of gas.

 

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