DCSIMG

Cindy is our Rose winner

Guardian Rose presentation to Cindy Riley who recognised the symptoms of Strep-B in her Grandson Callum.  Pictured from left George Riley, Cindy Riley, Callum Cashmore, three and Laura Bourne (w121022-5a)

Guardian Rose presentation to Cindy Riley who recognised the symptoms of Strep-B in her Grandson Callum. Pictured from left George Riley, Cindy Riley, Callum Cashmore, three and Laura Bourne (w121022-5a)

THIS week’s Guardian Rose goes to Langold nan Cindy Riley who helped to save her grandson’s life when he was just weeks old.

Cindy, 45, knew something was seriously wrong when baby Callum took a turn for the worse and rushed him straight to Bassetlaw Hospital.

Doctors later diagnosed him with Strep B - a deadly bacterial infection passed on to newborns in the womb or during delivery.

They said if Callum, now three, had been taken to hospital any later he could have died.

George’s husband Cindy said she was an amazing lady whose efforts deserved to be recognised.

“It’s simple - if she hadn’t done what she did Callum would probably not be here today,” he said.

Callum’s mum Laura Bourne, 23, said she took him to her mum’s house when he became seriously ill - less than two weeks after he was born.

“He was screaming so much - it wasn’t like him at all. I really panicked and didn’t know what to do. You just know when a cry is not right,” she said.

Cindy said she immediately sensed something was wrong and took him to Bassetlaw Hospital, where doctors gave him antibiotics and performed a lumbar puncture on him.

“It was a really horrendous experience. He was screaming so much and couldn’t breathe properly. I went home at 5am and just sat there in tears,” she said.

“The doctor said if he’d been brought in much later he probably wouldn’t be here today.”

Callum had to stay in hospital for 10 days but soon recovered and is now a happy and healthy three-year-old who attends nursery.

His family now want to raise awareness of being tested for Strep-B during pregnancy.

Group B streptococcal infections affect one-in-2,000 babies born every year in the UK and Ireland.

About 340 babies a year will develop group B streptococcal infection within seven days of birth (early group B streptococcus disease).

Said Laura: “You can get tested for it but I was never told about it. My sister fell pregnant soon after me and I made sure she was tested.”

“You have to pay for it, but it’s worth it to avoid going through what we did.”

She added: “Cindy is such a lovely mum and I don’t know where we’d be without her - thanks for everything.”

Said Cindy: “I am really touched to be presented with the Rose. The staff at Bassetlaw Hospital were absolutely fantastic and I only did what any other person would have done for their family.”

 
 
 

Back to the top of the page