Isle pupils now equipped with skills to save lives

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Tuition on how to save lives has become part of the essential school curriculum for Isle pupils.

The charity LIVES has linked with North Lincolnshire Council in the bid to teach secondary school students in years nine and 10 how to help someone when they suffer a cardiac arrest, and to perform vital CPR competently and with confidence.

Local MP, Andrew Percy, along with Coun John Briggs and Coun Julie Reed, visited The Axholme Academy in Crowle last Friday to see pupils demonstrate CPR training.

Pupils there were taught by LIVES volunteers exactly what they can do for people during cardiac arrest.

Time is of the essence, and delivering CPR at the earliest opportunity increases the person’s chances of survival considerably.

Mr Percy and his team secured £6,000 of funding to deliver this scheme to secondary schools locally.

The MP said: “It was great to see the pupils of Axholme Academy learning CPR from Lincolnshire Lives.

“Being a First Responder, I know first-hand the importance of using CPR on someone having a Cardiac Arrest.

“It is important to teach these life-saving skills to younger generations, which is why I was working on this initiative with LIVES before approaching North Lincs Council to fund this training in schools.”

He continued: “I am so pleased that this training was undertaken by the year nine and 10 students at schools across North Lincolnshire.

“Hopefully they will never have to use it, but it is an important life skill to have.”

When someone has a cardiac arrest, every minute without help reduces their chances of recovery by 10 per cent.

When CPR is given to a person in cardiac arrest, this keeps oxygenated blood flowing to the brain and heart until defibrillation or other advanced care can restore normal heart function.

Nikki Silver, CEO of the LIVES charity said: “We are really grateful to North Lincolnshire Council for working with our volunteers to deliver vital CPR lessons to year 10 students.

“CPR takes just minutes to learn and can make all the difference to a patient. Minutes really do matter.

“By equipping others with these skills we hope to increase the number of people that are able to help when the situation arises.”