Firbeck: Plans revealed for development of historic hall

Public meeting to unveil development plans for Firbeck Hall. Architect Chris Jubb is pictured G130710-3a
Public meeting to unveil development plans for Firbeck Hall. Architect Chris Jubb is pictured G130710-3a

Plans to create 66 new homes at Firbeck Hall have been unveiled to the public.

A meeting in Fibeck saw architects outline proposals currently being considered for the future of the historic building.

Plans include the demolition of the more recently added municipal-style flat roofed structures at the rear of Firbeck Hall, to create space to construct 36 townhouses around a central green space.

The hall itself would be converted into 21 apartments, with a further eight apartments created in the nearby stable block. An additional single dwelling is proposed for the walled garden.

The Friends of Firbeck Hall said there is still a long way to go in the process.

They added: “As a community, we are fortunate that we have convinced the developer of the value of engaging in the process in the way we have, and all parties involved should be congratulated for making this possible.”

“It is worth noting that the Friends group has worked tirelessly with this aim for the last three years, and it has been achieved.”

“The proposals represent a very significant development for Firbeck. We encourage everyone to review them carefully, objectively and invite everyone to engage positively in the processes that will follow this presentation.”

Residents and interested parties have been invited to send comment forms to the firm of architects, Building Link Design, which is leading the process.

Firbeck Hall was built back in 1594 by William West and was formerly the home of 19th Century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight.

In 1935 the hall was opened as a country club. At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck.

After the war, the building was bought by the Miners’ Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners, which closed in 1984.

It was purchased by Cambridge Construction and the hall fell into a state of disrepair. Jason Cooper bought the hall and its grounds in July 2010.

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