Pupils step into a Victorian era

A classroom has been transformed into a Victorian museum, created by pupils at Wales Primary School.  Pictured with the pupils is Deputy Headteacher Mark Hinde and Teaching Assistant Emma Baxter  (w111202-2a)
A classroom has been transformed into a Victorian museum, created by pupils at Wales Primary School. Pictured with the pupils is Deputy Headteacher Mark Hinde and Teaching Assistant Emma Baxter (w111202-2a)

A MODERN classroom in Wales had a Victorian look for the day as children took part in a school project.

Youngsters in year five at Wales Primary have been learning all about the Victorians.

A victorian museum has been created by pupils at Wales Primary School.  Pupil Lewis Hill, nine  (w111202-2b)

A victorian museum has been created by pupils at Wales Primary School. Pupil Lewis Hill, nine (w111202-2b)

They swapped their uniform for flat caps, waistcoats and long dresses as they stepped into clothes similar to those worn by their predecessors.

The costumes were all part of an interactive presentation that they put on for other pupils, parents and members of the local community.

“We have been learning about the Victorians in class,” said deputy headteacher Mark Hind, who was involved in the project along with teaching assistant Emma Baxter.

“We normally have a class assembly at the end of term where parents are invited at the children present their work.”

A victorian museum has been created by pupils at Wales Primary School.  Pictured is Amanda White, nine and Joseph Staniland, 10  (w111202-2c)

A victorian museum has been created by pupils at Wales Primary School. Pictured is Amanda White, nine and Joseph Staniland, 10 (w111202-2c)

“We decided to do something different and put on a museum where children were showcasing their work.”

“For the last few weeks the children have been preparing written work, presentations, ICT work and artwork with the intention of been a learning display.”

“They were also in it so it was interactive and they all had something to present.”

Mr Hind said children from other classes as well as parents and the local community came in at certain slots throughout the day to visit.

“The children had to vary the work they presented, so they had to think how a presentation for five and six-year-olds would differ from the ones they made to parents,” he added.

“They tried to make it as interactive as possible. There was an artwork table, a quiz and stamp designing.”

The event was such a success that Mr Hind believes the school will do more in the future.

He said: “The comments from the children and parents was that they got a lot more out of it.”

“It has definitely been a great success. It was just my class involved in it but we would look to do it right across the school when the topic lends itself.”