DCSIMG

Editor’s Comment: How earthquakes in Oklahoma could be bad news for Gainsborough

Prime Minister David Cameron looks on during a guided tour of the IGas shale drilling plant oil depot near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday January 13, 2014. French oil giant Total announced that it will become the first major oil company to explore for shale gas in Britain, confirming a report in The Financial Times. The Financial Times had reported that Total would announce the deal in which Singapore-based Dart Energy and UK-listed Igas and Edgdon resources are also partners in the project. See PA story POLITICS Fracking. Photo credit should read: Lindsey Parnaby/PA Wire

Prime Minister David Cameron looks on during a guided tour of the IGas shale drilling plant oil depot near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday January 13, 2014. French oil giant Total announced that it will become the first major oil company to explore for shale gas in Britain, confirming a report in The Financial Times. The Financial Times had reported that Total would announce the deal in which Singapore-based Dart Energy and UK-listed Igas and Edgdon resources are also partners in the project. See PA story POLITICS Fracking. Photo credit should read: Lindsey Parnaby/PA Wire

 

I have an app on my phone called Latest Quakes and essentially it does what it says on the tin - it gives real time updates on earthquakes - big and small- around the world. It tells you the exact location, depth, and strength of each earthquake.

To those who are interested in such things - like me - it really is fascinating stuff.

An interesting thing is, for the past few months I have noticed that every day there have been multiple small earthquakes in Oklahoma in the United States.

At this point you are probably wondering what I am rambling on about, and how any of this is relevant to Gainsborough, but just stick with me and I’ll explain why.

Oklahoma is a part of the world not known for its seismic activity, but that has all changed recently and there have been swarms of tremors.

Interestingly, fracking has been taking place in that part of the world in recent years and many have linked the earthquakes to that activity.

To me, as a layman, it seems like more than just a coincidence.

What is happening across the pond obviously throws up concerns about plans to potentially carry out fracking in and around Gainsborough.

For me, there has to be more thorough research done into the pros and cons of this method of extracting gas before it is given the green light on our doorstep.

 

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